How to reverse the diabetes epidemic in 3 years.

It’s out! I’m honoured to be part of an authorship team with Prof Robert Lustig and Cardiologist  Dr Aseem Malhotra, two rock stars of nutritional science and public health. These two guys are driving change and challenging dogma. The paper, just published here in the Journal of Insulin Resistance, is an up to date report on the science of sugar, and offers an eight-point plan to reverse the diabetes epidemic within three years. From the press release…. “Three international obesity experts, NHS Consultant Cardiologist Dr Aseem Malhotra, Professor Robert Lustig of the University… Read More

What the Fast! preorders live

Hi everyone, After a big year of research, writing, and testing of our low-carb fasting method – “Super fasting” we are finally good to go. We are super excited about What the Fast!, and how it continues the challenge on conventional nutritional-science wisdom. We’ve wrapped up the latest science, practice and yum recipes to provide you with a brilliant structure to mange your eating week (the sub-title is “How Monday and Tuesday will change your life”). I really want to take the opportunity to thank the team, especially my co-authors Dr Caryn… Read More

Podcast with Fitter

If you have a spare 30 mins, then you might want to go to 1.03 on the fitter podcast. An interview closing sport performance, low carb, and fasting – especially concentrating on our soon to be released book “What the Fast” https://www.fitter.co.nz/fitter-radio/2018/4/8/episode-208-prof-grant-schofield

Grain fibre, productivity, and type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in New Zealand

You might have noticed claims in the media in the last few days that New research conducted by Deloitte Access Economics and Nutrition Research Australia shows that if every New Zealand adult adds three serves of high fibre grain food to their daily diet, it could save the economy an estimated $607 million a year in reduced healthcare costs and lost productivity, and potentially avert 34,000 new cases of cardiovascular disease and 68,000 new cases of type 2 diabetes. This is from a report (dae-nz-fibre-economics) that Deloitte produced for Kellogg’s. Industry funding was… Read More

A short guide to reverse cholesterol transport

Cholesterol is a molecule required by every cell of the body in fairly large amounts. It can be easily synthesised by these cells, or taken up by them from LDL and other ApoB lipoproteins, but cannot be broken down. Cholesterol is not soluble in water, and thus must be carried through the blood on lipoprotein particles. When the cholesterol produced or taken up by the cells of the body becomes surplus to requirements it is extracted by HDL (ApoA1 lipoproteins) and carried back to the liver for disposal as bile salts and… Read More

We are recruiting for a low carb research study

We’re recruiting participants for a research study about low carbohydrate diets. The study “How low do you need to go? Comparing symptoms of diet induction and mood with outcomes from diets containing differing levels of carbohydrate restriction” seeks to help us understand the effects of differing types of low-carb diets on symptoms of carbohydrate withdrawal (known as ‘Keto-Flu’) and on outcomes from dietary intervention. http://www.carbappropriate.study/ We are seeking healthy, non-diabetic people aged between 24 and 49 who are currently seeking weight loss. Please be aware that due to the nature of this… Read More

The Empire Strikes Back – American Heart Association gets Presidential on Saturated Fats.

These days most people associate the word “Presidential” with a lot of bluster that tends to disguise real problems and do more harm than good, as well as a partisan approach to any question. In the US at least, being “presidential” means a pathological inability to admit error, and a cavalier approach to the evidence and the scientific method. The question is whether this trait is moving elsewhere?  We’d say that these vices are on full display in the new American Heart Association (AHA) position statement on saturated fat and cardiovascular disease.[1] First,… Read More

Defending LCHF in the climate change debate

Our last post which questioned in passing aspects of the plant-based position on climate change caused quite a fuss in some circles. We were accused of being science-deniers, on a par with Trump and the anti-vaxxers, by some. There’s a recent blog about us here. The atmosphere is warming, the sea levels are rising, species are dying and habitats becoming sterile, and the major contribution – certainly the largest modifiable contribution – is the fossil fuel combustion which has gone on since the beginning of the industrial era and shows no sign… Read More

Red Meat Will Kill You – and make it look like an accident.

By George Henderson and Grant Schofield Disclaimer – we’re not recommending that people eat red meat in preference to white meat, anymore than we think people should eat red peppers instead of onions. A mixed diet of various types of animal and plant foods, as close to nature as is consistent with good hygiene, good digestion, and good eating, is the default option for good nutrition. However, red meat epidemiology is the modern example of bad science which, because it panders to a vegetarian bias that runs along class lines, isn’t being… Read More

NZ case study; A citizen scientist controls autoimmune diabetes without insulin, with a low carb diet, a glucose meter, and metformin.

The case study is a very important type of medical publication that’s overlooked in this age of big data. Unlike large statistical studies, which tell you the probability of something happening, the case study tells you whether something CAN happen at all, and under exactly which circumstances it has happened. Case studies answer questions like “Can autoimmune diabetes, with lower insulin production, be managed long-term without insulin?” Yes, it can, and this is described in full detail and a clear and simple style in a new case-study from Christchurch.[1] 2017 Nelson Jacobs… Read More