The fat emperor again

Ivor Cummings latest talk is worth a watch. He basically does my entire third year “Lifestyle Disease” class in a single lecture. So you can save taking that and just watch this.

I don’t buy the whole “you have to be an engineer to have a problem solving brain” line Ivor.  I’ve heard enough of that from my Dad over the years, who is also an engineer.  True though, they are both good problem solvers.

http://www.thefatemperor.com/blog/2017/4/3/fat-emperor-at-weston-price-limerick-a-root-cause-talk-cholesterol-diabetes

Author: Prof. Grant Schofield

I am Grant Schofield, Professor of Public Health at Auckland University of Technology and director of the university's Human Potential Centre (HPC) located at the Millennium Campus in Auckland, New Zealand. My research and teaching interests are in wellbeing and chronic disease prevention especially reducing the risk and eventual mortality and morbidity from obesity, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. I live by the motto "be the best you can be" and have a strong commitment to peak performance in which I also do consulting work. I’ve been interested in human health and performance for my whole career. I started in psychology, went into sport and exercise psychology, then into public health, especially physical activity, then obesity. There have been some twists and turns along the way, which are the reasons for why I do what I do – you can read about those in my first blog entry. I want to know how we can be the best we can be. This crosses disciplines such as biology, medicine, pubic health, and productivity management. The cornerstones are nutrition, exercise, sleep, neuroscience, psychology and wellbeing. In my blog, I cover these topics under the broad heading of the Science of Human Potential.

9 thoughts on “The fat emperor again”

  1. I also don’t think you need to be an engineer to have a problem-solving brain and I was trained as an engineer. What helps innovation though are problem-solving minds that are not mired in dogma and conventional thought. Their challenge is to learn enough domain expertise to be useful. That is Ivor.

  2. Hi Grant,

    I’ve just watched Ivor’s talk and here I am at 74 with a ‘low cholesterol’ but when I had an angiogram they found my heart arteries full of cholesterol! I queried the cholesterol findings and was informed that it is genetic (yes, heart disease in the family) and there is nothing I can do about it.” No diet will help but if your symptoms get worse we will look at a bypass”. They couldn’t put stents in because of the location of the calcifications so I am sent home to…. what?

    I am now trying low carb but wondering if there is any help I can find from you or if there are any studies or programmes I can join. I am determined to better my health – and prove the ‘experts’ wrong.

    Plus, I have a life to live – as long as possible. My father, two brothers all died in their 60s. One brother left with stents and then there’s me, I wish to break the family tradition.

    Can you please suggest a plan of attack?

    Cheers,

    Beverley Gomez.

  3. I reckon Ivor Cummings is without a doubt one of the better speakers in this area. Real gift for getting key points across simply.

  4. Ha thx Grant – I admit I turned on the arrogance for the Oirish audience specifically; they love that swaggering stuff… 😉 Note I didn’t at all say non-engineers can’t do it – I just pumped the profession a bit. Mind you, even amongst engineers, there is only a minority really cut out for the big ones. I’ve been a people manager for ~15 years too. so I get to see those talent distributions…! 😉

    Best

    Ivor

  5. Thought your readers would be interested in this:
    Many great interviews will be available for free,
    including Ivor Cummins, Eric Westman, Thomas
    Seyfried, Sarah Hallberg, Tim Noakes, among others.
    Here’s the link: http://lipedemaproject.org/
    Check out the great people they have interviewed.
    It’s free each day, starting April 19th.

  6. Hello Beverley,
    (Disclaimer: I am not a medic in any sense of the word!)
    I’d recommend reading:
    “Cholesterol Clarity” by Jimmy Moore, Dr Eric Westman.
    “Fat and Cholesterol Don’t Cause Heart Attacks”, Paul J Rosch (ed).
    “The Big Fat Surprise”, Nina Teicholz.
    And there are lots more out there…
    Good luck with all that lot…
    Archie Robertson

  7. Hi Beverly,

    I know your question is directed at Grant, and I am not in a position to advise more than that you are certainly looking in the right place – LCHF. I am certainly a convert, and passionate about the benefits (definitively plural) of adopting a LCHF lifestyle, with my own journey testament to this. There is certainly a lot of very good advice on the web (YouTube), but try sticking to the known names as there are some idiots out there!

    Allan.

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